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Report: Next iPad Will Come in Gold


If the silver and space gray iPads are a little too boring for your taste, you might soon have a new color option to choose from - gold.


According to a new report from Bloomberg, citing unnamed people familiar with the plans, Apple is planning to add a gold color option for its next-gen 9.7-inch iPad, expected to be unveiled later this month.


Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.


The company is reportedly adding the gold model in an effort to 'boost a category that's posted declining shipments this year,' Bloomberg noted. Apple sold 13.3 million iPads during the most recent quarter, down from 16.3 million in the previous quarter and 26 million over the holiday quarter.


This is not the first we're hearing about a gold iPad. Early last month, KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo predicted Apple would introduce a gold color option for the next iPad, which may be called the iPad Air 2.


The new color option would bring the iPad in line with the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, as well as iPhone 5s (pictured), which come in silver, space gray, and gold. Rumblings of a gold iPhone first cropped up in July 2013 and were backed up by several reliable sources before Apple officially unveiled the gilded-hued device two months later.


Bloomberg, meanwhile, also noted that Apple is gearing up to introduce a larger iPad with a 12.9-inch screen next year.


A Separate PayPal Still Must Solve the Payments Puzzle


Moving money through the pipes of the financial system is a grindingly mundane activity, but that has not stopped Wall Street and Silicon Valley from promoting it as a hot new thing.


The latest burst of excitement occurred on Tuesday, when eBay announced that it was going to spin off PayPal, its electronic payments unit, as a separate public company. Apple generated enormous hoopla in early September when it unveiled Apple Pay, a technology that may make it easier to pay for things with an iPhone.


Innovation needs a problem to solve. And in this case, the argument is that the traditional payments system - the vast, Byzantine plumbing that is made up of banks and credit card companies - is cumbersome and expensive. In the dreams of the disrupters, companies like MasterCard and Visa are vulnerable. So when PayPal trades as a stand-alone company next year, investors will have a way to bet on the revolution.


A closer look at PayPal's numbers, however, suggests that the old order is far from done.


PayPal has been hacking away at the established system since it was founded in 1998. To its credit, it has secured a substantial foothold that enabled it to process $180 billion in payments last year. Still, that progress has not generated the sort of high-octane profitability that technology investors yearn for, according to some analyses of the company.


Mark May, an analyst with Citigroup, says that, while PayPal has stronger growth than companies like Visa and MasterCard, it has weaker profit margins. He estimates that next year PayPal will earn $2.4 billion before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, known as Ebitda. That would represent an 18 percent increase from 2014. True, that growth rate is roughly double that attained by established payments companies, but PayPal's margins are much weaker.


PayPal makes 26 cents of Ebitda for every dollar of revenue, compared with roughly 65 cents for every dollar of revenue at Visa and MasterCard, Mr. May estimates. The cost of expanding its network has saddled PayPal with proportionately higher expenses. And a potential competitive threat from Apple Pay has also dimmed PayPal's prospects.


The upshot: Mr. May says that PayPal may end up having the same sort of valuation on the stock market as its established rivals. At 14 times his forecast for next year's Ebitda, PayPal would have a market value of $34 billion.


That is a mere fourth of Visa's value, yet much larger than the next wave of payments disrupters. Square, a payments company led by the Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey, announced a financing last month that valued the private company at $6 billion. And Stripe, another online payments processor, also has attracted financing from prominent venture capitalists.


PayPal could break out big in payments in several ways.


Its business has one big advantage: It allows consumers to set up a PayPal account so that it deducts money directly from their bank accounts. Such transactions have far lower fees than typical credit card payments, making them more attractive for merchants, which pay the fees. Apple Pay, by contrast, works through the credit card companies, which means its transactions will often be more expensive than a bank debit through PayPal.


'Apple Pay is not cheaper,' Mr. May said. 'PayPal can be far cheaper for the merchant.'


The challenge for PayPal is finding ways to exploit these lower fees. One obvious idea would be to work with merchants to pass on some of the fee savings to customers, either in lower prices or rebates. Imagine a supermarket checkout offering two prices: One for paying with an established credit card, and a lower price for using PayPal. Such two-tier pricing has not yet appeared at many retailers, though some gas stations offer it. Still, over time, providing such an option to consumers might drive an increasing amount of transactions through lower-fee companies like PayPal, bolstering its revenue.


And as a stand-alone company, all of PayPal's resources could be aimed at tackling such challenges.


Still, the attraction of lower fees may not be enough. For instance, established credit card companies, using well-honed loyalty programs, have powerful ways of retaining consumers.


PayPal's success might, therefore, also depend on producing a technology that is markedly easier for consumers to use than a credit or debit card. Right now, paying for something with a phone is often no quicker than paying with a card. PayPal would need to improve on that, but its recent record in setting up easy payments in stores is not strong. And Apple Pay, with its iPhone fingerprint authorization, may catch on quickly, making it harder for PayPal to compete.


If Apple does steal such a lead, it will be on the back of the current payment system, and it could entrench the higher fees paid by merchants.


In other words, PayPal may be the only big disrupter in this battle. That is sure to get investors intrigued when its stock starts to trade. But it is precisely the thing that could make it a risky bet.



The move, which the activist hedge fund magnate Carl C. Icahn had called for, will cleave eBay almost in half and separate it from a company that generates almost half its revenue.


JibJab is back with a personalized GIF maker


Wise to the fact that even your mom is over animated e-cards, a denizen of an internet past is trying to reinvent itself. JibJab -- which rose to fame a a purveyor of political satire and ' Starring You' video gift cards -- is today launching JibJab Messages, an iOS app that lets you personalize GIFs with your friends' faces, filters, and meme-style text.


At launch the app features a selection of 'hilarious' content for you to play around with for free, and after your first ten messages JibJab will be happy to sell you additional content for a buck. A single tap copies the final GIF to your clipboard, meaning you can share JibJab Messages with your social app of choice. Whether, in an age of Snapchat and Emoji-only messaging, people are in need of more messaging options remains to be seen, but if you're interested, you can check out our finest effort below or head to the App Store to try it out for yourself.


Featured Stories Hands-on with Nokia's Here Maps for Android Basis unveils its first fitness tracker since getting acquired by Intel HP's $199 Windows laptop arrives alongside a pair of tablets Murata's cheerleader robots move around on balls and do it in J-Pop unison BlackBerry's Passport is a square in looks, but not personality Acer Chromebook 13 review: long battery life, but performance falls short BlackBerry put a $2,000 smartphone into our pauper's hands

Protesters Are Targets of Scrutiny Through Their Phones

HONG KONG - As tens of thousands of protesters in Hong Kong continued to shut down the city's main arteries on Wednesday in a call for democracy, a quieter struggle was playing out to monitor the demonstrations online.


The most recent salvo came to light Tuesday, when Lacoon Mobile Security said that it had tracked the spread of a fake mobile application designed to eavesdrop on protesters' communications. In what is known as a phishing attack, smartphone users in Hong Kong have been receiving a link on WhatsApp to download the software, along with a note: 'Check out this Android app designed by Code4HK for the coordination of OCCUPY CENTRAL!'


Code4HK, a community of programmers who have been working to support the democracy movement, had nothing to do with the application, according to Lacoon.


Though Michael Shaulov, Lacoon's chief executive, said it was impossible to be certain about the origin of the fake app, he said signs pointed to the Chinese government. Given the 'targets of the operation, where the servers are based and the sophistication of the attack, it doesn't leave much room to the imagination.'


After users download the application, it has the ability to gain access to personal data like passwords and bank information, spy on phone calls and messages and track the physical location of the infected smartphone. It is unclear how many smartphones in Hong Kong have been hit, but in similar attacks in the past, one in 10 phones that received such a message became infected, according to Mr. Shaulov.


'These really cheap social-engineering tricks, they have a high rate of success,' he said.


What makes the malicious app stand out is a version that can infect Apple's iOS mobile operating system, which is usually more secure than Google's Android, Mr. Shaulov said. Android is the dominant system on non-Apple phones.


'This is the first time that we have seen such operationally sophisticated iOS malware operational, which is actually developed by a Chinese-speaking entity,' he said.


Mr. Shaulov's company traced the fake app to a computer that closely resembled those scrutinized by Mandiant, an American security firm that published a 60-page study last year that linked hacking attacks on American companies to the Chinese military.


Map: Areas of Protest in Hong Kong

It's not the first time the democracy movement in Hong Kong has drawn sophisticated web attacks. In June, an unofficial referendum on Hong Kong's political future that allowed people in Hong Kong to vote online drew one of the largest denial-of-service attacks in history, according to Matthew Prince, the chief executive of CloudFlare, which helped defend the referendum site from the attack. Such attacks are designed to overwhelm a site with online traffic, causing it to shut down.


Protesters in the current demonstrations in Hong Kong are making use of a new app that allows them to send messages without a cellular or Internet connection. Introduced in March, FireChat makes use of a cellphone's radio and Bluetooth communications to create a network of phones close to one another - up to about 80 yards. Though downloaded widely by the Hong Kong protesters after rumors spread that the Internet would be cut, many have been making use of the app in areas where crowds have overwhelmed the cellphone system.


Other technological help has come from Code4HK, the programmers' group. Its website provides links to live video feeds of the demonstrations, offers updated Google maps showing where supply and medical stations are in protest areas, and maintains an open spreadsheet that shows what supplies are needed.


Within China, the cat-and-mouse game that often goes on between politically minded Internet users and the government's censors continued. Since Saturday, the Facebook-owned Instagram service has been widely inaccessible, according to users and several Internet monitors, leading commentators to speculate that the government had closed access to the app to stanch the flow of images of the protests. The rate of deletions of posts on China's version of Twitter, Weibo, has also soared in recent days, an indication of how concerned the government is that news of the protests might spread unrest to China, according to Fu King-wa, a professor of media studies at Hong Kong University.


Despite the spike in deletions, David Bandurski, a researcher at the University of Hong Kong, said that the huge flow of posts and the reliance on humans to individually censor content meant that some posts were getting through. Possibly more so than on newer products like Tencent's mobile messaging app WeChat, which he said showed more efficiency in blocking posts from its social network.


Beneath one post from a Chinese journalist on Weibo, Mr. Bandurski said he saw 'page after page of comments.'


'It had become a public online square for people talking about what's happening in Hong Kong,' he said.


Microsoft launches Lumia 730, 830 and 930 just in time for festivals


Ajey Mehta, MD of Nokia India Sales Pvt Ltd, poses with the Lumia 730, 830 and 930.


Microsoft Devices is preparing for the festival season with three new Lumia devices aimed at the affordable and high-end segment. The Lumia 730 priced Rs 15,299, the Lumia 830 priced Rs 28,799 will try and woo those looking for a phone in the affordable range, while the Lumia 930 flagship will have a high-end Rs 38,649 price tag.


Ajey Mehta, Managing Director, Nokia India Sales Pvt. Ltd., a subsidiary of Microsoft Mobiles Oy, said the two affordable devices will pack features that are seem mostly in high-end phones. He said Microsoft services like Skype, OneNote and Cortana available across most of the mid and high-end Lumia phones will be a clear USP for these devices.


In fact, with the three new devices as well as the Lumia 1520, Microsoft is now offering 1TB of cloud storage free for the first six months. After that users will have to pay Rs 125 per month for using this feature.



The Lumia 930, launched globally in April, stands apart for its 20MP PureView camera with ZEISS optics and advanced Rich Recording. It has a 2.2GHz Snapdragon quad-core processor with 2GB RAM and 32 GB internal storage. The thin phone also have a stylish design that sets it apart from the rest of the Lumia range.



The Lumia 830 on the other hand tries to bring top-end features to a more affordable price point. It has a 10 MP camera wth Carl Zeiss optic. It is powered by a 1.2GHz Snapdragon quad-core processor with 1GB RAM and 16GB internal storage.



The Lumia 730 dual SIM model is much more affordable but brings a good camera and Microsoft services to this range. It is the most affordable device with wireless charging, though this feature is not being


The Lumia 830 and 730 were announced at the IFA in Berlin in September.


Microsoft has also announced the availability of HD-10, a Microsoft Screen-Sharing device that lets people beam any content from their smartphone to an HDMI-enabled screen. The HD-10 will be priced Rs 5,999.


US Attorney General attacks encryption

JULIA EDWARDS



Joining a cry from law enforcement officials concerned about data encryption on Apple's newest operating system, US Attorney General Eric Holder said that officers should not be blocked from the information they need to investigate a crime.


❏ FBI director slams Apple encryption


❏ Apple adding new iCloud alerts after hack


Apple's new iPhone 6, released this month, and Google's coming update of the Android smartphone have data encryption so sophisticated that only the user may unlock it. Even law enforcement officers with search warrants would not have access.


'It is fully possible to permit law enforcement to do its job while still adequately protecting personal privacy,' Holder said in a speech before the Global Alliance Against Child Sexual Abuse Online.


Holder said quick access to phone data can help law enforcement officers find and protect victims, such as those targeted by kidnappers and sexual predators.


Justice Department officials said Holder is merely asking for cooperation from the companies at this time.


Holder's comments echo concerns raised last week by FBI Director James Comey.


'What concerns me about this is companies marketing something expressly to allow people to place themselves beyond the law,' he said.


Comey said agents at the FBI have had conversations with Apple and Google to better understand the technology.


- Reuters


Intel Implements IoT Technology to Save Costs at Malaysian Plant


Intel produces the low-cost and low-power Quark processors, specifically made for IoT technology. What better way to sell your products than by showing how well they work for you? Internet of Things is the next big thing in technology development and Intel wants to ride the wave as one of the biggest players.


IoT is basically the next level of automatization, but the effects of implementing it are more complex than that. While so far, IoT has been described as a key element of user interaction with home appliances, now Intel hits a soft spot for industrial producers.


Philip Cronin, Intel Asia-Pacific sales director described how IoT can be used to increase production efficiency during an interview on Tuesday.


Intel runs a plant in Penang, Malaysia. With the help of IoT technology, they managed to save $9 million in running costs. By equipping CPU tester modules with sensors, different machines started 'talking' to each other. The database containing the information sent by various components was ran through Revolution Analytics software. In the end, the plant managed to reduce the number of faulty products and increased its productivity.


A plant will increase production if various components can be made to interact and adapt to the changes in the production environment. Cronin calls the new philosophy 'productive maintenance'. By analyzing the data sent by each machine, running costs can be reduced as repairs and adjustments are predictable.


'We think predictive maintenance will be one of the bigger plays because it lends itself to IoT easily,' Cronin said. 'If I have a thousand machines at a motor car plant and I can figure out which ones are running too far, too high, too soon then I start to get into predictive maintenance and the resultant savings.'


The biggest tech manufacturers in the world decided that a fast adoption of IoT technology requires them to agree upon industry standards, as devices have to talk the same language. At the moment there are two groups trying to gain supremacy in the IoT market. The Open Interconnect Consortium includes Samsung, Dell and Intel, among others. AllSeen Alliance is made out of Qualcomm, Microsoft, Cisco, Sony and other important consumer brands.


What ties them all together is the interest to gain the largest chunk possible of a market that will go up to $1.9 billion by 2019 from just around $400 million in 2014.


iOS 8.1 Beta Shows Apple Pay Settings, Potential iPad Touch ID


You won't be using Apple Pay on your iPhone 6 until some time in October, but an early look at iOS 8.1 provides a quick look at how the upcoming mobile payment system might be configured. Developer Hamza Sood tweeted some interesting findings from his time with the iOS 8.1 beta, which includes an Apple Pay settings menu, as well as potential code for a Touch ID-enabled iPad.


Based on a screenshot posted by Sood, you'll be able to manage Apple Pay in the Passbook settings menu. The menu has an 'Add Credit or Debit Card' option, as well as a 'Transaction Defaults' sub-menu that lets you pick a default card and set your billing address, shipping address, email address and phone number.


MORE: iOS 8 Review


Sood also posted Apple's 'About Apple Pay & Privacy' disclaimer, which notes that your credit or debit card number, billing address, iTunes account information and location may be sent to Apple to 'determine the eligibility of your card, for fraud detection purposed and to facilitate your use of the Apple Pay feature.'


The iOS 8 Apple Pay menu looks fairly standard, but what's more interesting is what Sood found within the software's code. One specific string contains the text 'Pay with iPad using Touch ID. With Apple Pay, you no longer need to type card numbers and shipping information.'


The next iPad has been long rumored to sport a Touch ID fingerprint reader, in addition to the iPhone 6's faster A8 processor and a sharper iSight camera. The purported iPad Air 2 is also rumored to launch in October, which would coincide nicely with the debut of Apple Pay and, presumably, the launch of iOS 8.1.


Sources: AppleInsider , Hamza Sood Mike Andronico is an Associate Editor at Tom's Guide. Follow Mike @MikeAndronico and on Google+ . Follow us @TomsGuide , on Facebook and on Google+


You won't be using Apple Pay on your iPhone 6 until some time in October, but an early look at iOS 8.1 provides a quick look at how the upcoming mobile payment system might be configured. Developer tweeted some interesting findings from his time with the iOS 8.1 beta, which includes an Apple Pay settings menu, as well as potential code for a Touch ID-enabled iPad.


Based on a screenshot posted by Sood, you'll be able to manage Apple Pay in the Passbook settings menu. The menu has an 'Add Credit or Debit Card' option, as well as a 'Transaction Defaults' sub-menu that lets you pick a default card and set your billing address, shipping address, email address and phone number.


MORE: iOS 8 Review


Sood also posted Apple's 'About Apple Pay & Privacy' disclaimer, which notes that your credit or debit card number, billing address, iTunes account information and location may be sent to Apple to 'determine the eligibility of your card, for fraud detection purposed and to facilitate your use of the Apple Pay feature.'


The iOS 8 Apple Pay menu looks fairly standard, but what's more interesting is what Sood within the software's code. One specific string contains the text 'Pay with iPad using Touch ID. With Apple Pay, you no longer need to type card numbers and shipping information.'


The next iPad has been long rumored to sport a Touch ID fingerprint reader, in addition to the iPhone 6's faster A8 processor and a sharper iSight camera. The purported iPad Air 2 is also rumored to launch in October, which would coincide nicely with the debut of Apple Pay and, presumably, the launch of iOS 8.1.


FBI Clashes with Apple, Google Over Phone Encryption


When it comes to the U.S. federal government, one thing is clear: They want mass access to consumer data, and they want it bad. In the wake of the NSA's ability to snoop into people's private files, Apple and Google have tightened their privacy practices. This, however, sits ill with the FBI and local law enforcement, which assert that Apple and Google are hampering their ability to crack down on criminals.


The Washington Post covered the issue on Sept. 25, when it documented James B. Comey, director of the FBI, slamming Apple and Google's recently revealed encryption initiatives. These two companies came under fire when the world learned last year that the NSA had the ability to plumb the depths of people's private cloud storage information.


MORE: Best Mac Antivirus Software 2014

Comey asserted that encrypting data to the point where even Apple and Google themselves could not access customer data (which is their goal) would essentially shield malefactors and make it easier for them to break the law. Bloomberg reported that Cathy Lanier, chief of the Washington Metropolitan Police Department, said that communicating by smartphone is 'the preferred method of the pedophile and the criminal.'


At present, neither Apple nor Google has responded to Comey's comments, but legality may eventually compel them to. Both companies assert (correctly) that improved encryption protocols protect everyday users from potential cybercrime and unauthorized access. However, there's no denying that this also makes it harder for law enforcement to access customer data - even when the agency has a warrant to do so.


Even if you'd prefer the FBI reading a few innocent emails without permission to a drug trafficking ring operating in your hometown, the issue is not so cut-and-dried. Timothy B. Lee, a senior editor at Vox, brought up a point of international law. Apple and Google do not only serve American customers. If the American government wants unrestricted access to data, that could easily set a precedent that would allow countries like Saudi Arabia or Russia to request the same treatment.


For now, the issue is still very much up in the air, but expect more back-and-forth as the parties involved make their positions and demands clear.


Marshall Honorof is a Staff Writer for Tom's Guide. Contact him at mhonorof@tomsguide.com . Follow him @marshallhonorof and on . Follow us , on and on .

Apple Releases OS X Bash Update to Fix 'Shellshock' Security Flaw in ...

Apple today released OS X bash update 1.0 for OS X Mavericks to fix a vulnerability in the bash UNIX shell.


The security flaw, known in the media as ' Shellshock,' was discovered last week. Uncovered by security researchers, the exploit in the bash command shell in OS X and Linux could be used to deploy malicious code.



According to an Apple spokesperson, most OS X users were not at risk form the bash vulnerabilities, but the company promised to work quickly to provide an update.


Bash, a UNIX command shell and language included in OS X, has a weakness that could allow unauthorized users to remotely gain control of vulnerable systems. With OS X, systems are safe by default and not exposed to remote exploits of bash unless users configure advanced UNIX services. We are working to quickly provide a software update for our advanced UNIX users.

Along with the fix for OS X Mavericks, Apple has released updates for both OS X Lion and OS X Mountain Lion. There is no Yosemite download available as of yet, but Apple may be planning to issue a fix in the near future. The three updates are available via Apple's support pages and should be available via the Software Update tool soon.


Playdate: We're livestreaming 'Middle

Welcome, ladygeeks and gentlenerds, to the new era of gaming. The one where you get to watch, and comment, as other people livestream gameplay from next-gen consoles. Because games! They're fun!

Emerging like a Nazg├╗l in the night this fall is Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor. You could easily dismiss the game as a licensed cash-in on the likes of the Assassin's Creed or Batman: Arkham franchises, but the truth of the matter is that Shadow of Mordor is better than the most recent entries in either of those series. Sure, there's clambering up walls in very assassin-like fashion and rhythmic combat that'd make The World's Greatest Detective blush, but the team at Monolith (perhaps best known for the F.E.A.R. and Condemned series of first-person horror games) outclasses the competition in nearly every aspect with this incredibly violent take on J.R.R. Tolkien's classic source material. Until recently, it was fairly underhyped and that seems to have been its best asset; allowing the game's quality, not its PR machine, to do the heavy lifting. Still on the fence about picking it up today, though? Well, we're going to be streaming it on PlayStation 4, right here starting at 7 p.m. Eastern / 4 p.m. Pacific.


Watch live video from Engadget on www.twitch.tv

PlayStation 4 </a>Featured Stories Hands-on with Nokia's Here Maps for Android Basis unveils its first fitness tracker since getting acquired by Intel HP's $199 Windows laptop arrives alongside a pair of tablets Murata's cheerleader robots move around on balls and do it in J-Pop unison BlackBerry's Passport is a square in looks, but not personality Acer Chromebook 13 review: long battery life, but performance falls short BlackBerry put a $2,000 smartphone into our pauper's hands

US Attorney General voices concern over Apple's iOS 8 security features

Attorney General Eric Holder is the latest government official to come down on new mobile OS security features from Apple and Google that make unlocking a smartphone nearly impossible, even for law enforcement agencies.



During a speech in front of the Global Alliance Against Child Sexual Abuse Online on Tuesday, Holder criticized Apple's iOS 8 device encryption for essentially being too secure, saying officers who require access to an iPhone should have a way in, reports Reuters


Holder implied that a middle ground can be reached between government access and secure device encryption without impinging on public privacy.


'It is fully possible to permit law enforcement to do its job while still adequately protecting personal privacy,' Holder said.


Apple says it no longer holds encryption keys for devices running iOS 8, meaning the only way to gain access to a locked iPhone or iPad would be through the passcode holder. This complicates things for law enforcement agencies wanting to gain access to a suspect's smartphone, even if the proper warrants and documentation are supplied.


In time sensitive cases, such as kidnappings, an iPhone's data could help find and save the lives of potential victims, Holder said. For example, call history, geo-location tags, emails, contact lists and more can be locked away on a suspect's handset.


Holder's comments come one week after FBI Director James Comey said unbreakable encryption could one day pose a threat to national security.


New Tinder

If for whatever reason you feel like Tinder is lacking in total assholes, there's a new app called Luxy, that allows you to only connect with 'successful, attractive people.' That's right, it's a dating app exclusively for douchebags.


It claims to be 'Tinder, minus the riff-raff.' And also minus people who can spell.



I'm not sure what a 'lawyes' is, but it sure sounds successful!


'With the rise of high-speed digital dating, it's about time somebody introduced a filter to weed out low-income prospects by neighborhood,' explained Luxy CEO 'Tim T.' His real identity is being kept anonymous for some reason (maybe the app is a joke?), and it seems likely he is entirely fictional. So far Mr. T. is one of only three people who have reviewed the app on the Google Play store, and- according to CNN -provided the only written review, though it appears to have been deleted.


Company spokesperson Darren Shuster elaborates on the type of people you'll find on Luxy. 'Look, these members drive the best cars, hang out at the fanciest hotels, live in the biggest houses, wear the best clothes. It doesn't take long to weed out those who belong on a different kind of dating site.'


Luxy functions exactly like Tinder, the key difference being its different profile options. It requires you to select your hobbies from a list that includes things like 'AnimalFancy' and 'SkiingSnow' [ sic], to 'choose your fav luxury brands up to 5″ [again, sic], and reveal your net assets. You know, all of the important things that lead to a deep and profound love.


Shuster claims that the average income of its male users is $200,000 (there's no mention of the average income of female users-in Luxy, they're only required to be attractive). They currently have no means of actually verifying their users' incomes. So it was surprisingly easy to create a fake profile. I present to you my new alter ego: Eccentric playboy billionaire Dr. Vonstein T. Moneybags, Esq.



His interests include zeppelins, monocles, and hunting humans for sport. If any ladies want to go for a late night zeppelin ride to his swimming pool that's filled with gold coins, swipe right.


Pebble's Snarky Reply to the Apple Watch: 'Breathe Jony, It's Just a Watch'


Image: Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press


If you were wondering how Pebble was responding to the Apple Watch, check out the brand's website.


The Kickstarter-developed smart watch brand has put up a special message for Apple SVP of Design Jony Ive:



Scroll down and the brand explains that the Pebble gets up to seven days of battery life off of one charge (versus about a day for the Apple Watch) and that 'Pebble is made by real people, for real people keeping it real.'


Finally: 'Just to recap: We made a watch, we didn't solve global warming.'


After cutting its prices to $99 and $199 for the Pebble and Pebble Steel, respectively, Pebble is suddenly a cheaper alternative to the Apple Watch, which will start at $350 when it goes on sale some time in 2015. Introduced last year, Pebble Technology raised $10.3 million on Kickstarter for its eponymous smart watch and another $15 million from venture capitalists.


The company has sold more than 400,000 watches and was projected to sell as many as 800,000 this year. That prediction came before Apple's introduction earlier this month. Apple is expected to sell as many as 10 million Apple Watches in the first year, according to some estimates.


Ive, who is usually effusive with praise for new Apple products, reportedly bragged that Switzerland - home of the world's luxury watches - would be in trouble after the Apple Watch launch. The Economist however points out that only 6% of watch revenues come from models that cost under $500.


Google Drive for Education offers unlimited Drive storage for students


Students that use Google Apps for Education are in for a treat. Google is now rolling out a new set of features for Google Apps for Education that includes a new unlimited storage plan for Google Drive. Yes, the only limit you'll have to deal with is a 5TB size limit per file.


All students that are currently using Google Apps for Education will be getting Drive for Education for free, along with two other features: Google Apps Vault is a search and archive tool that will keep information from your email, chat and storage to easily search through and sort, and Enhanced Auditing offers auditing tools for those who need them.


It's great to see Google focusing on offering more free services to students. If you're a student, these features will be rolling out over the coures of the next few months, with unlimited storage coming first in the next few weeks. Are you a student, and are you excited?


Source: Google for Education


Dima Aryeh is a Russian obsessed with all things tech. He does photography, is an avid phone modder (who uses an AT&T Galaxy Note II), a heavy gamer (both PC and 360), and an aspiring home mechanic. He is also an avid fan of music, especially power metal.

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